REFLECTIONS - PAGE 4



February 22, 1967, Washington's Birthday

SOME OF MY EDUCATIONAL, SOCIAL, & PERHAPS POLITICAL OR BUSINESS SIDE OF LIFE.

As I have mentioned before, I started my school days at the Hamrick School House, one and one-half mile East of here. T. P. Hamrick was my teacher. That was Shafter Hamrick's father. His wife is still living at 91 years old.

The next year I went to a one room building up at Double Springs Church just West of the old frame church building, just North of the present church auditorium. We had three or four months each year.

I went to the first Free School till I was about 17 years old. Then I went to a subscription school at Boiling Springs in an old frame building supposed to have a chimney at each end, but never got but one built. I have a picture of it here somewhere. Prof. Bert Bridges taught the school. This was about 1898. My Father went to school to Prof. Bridges at one time.

I took a Business Course at Shelby in a frame building called The College for Girls. It did not run many years. It was located where the City Hall now stands. This was about 1900. The teacher was Prof. Plonk. He married Mr. Wiley Pruitt's daughter. Then soon after, he got gone. I never heard of him no more.

I never did keep books for anyone except myself. I took a 12-weeks winter course at the A & M College at Raleigh in 1906. There were only 3 or 4 buildings there at that time. I don't know how many now. It is one of the State Universities now.

Your Mama never went to school much, 2 or 3 months in a year and then missed 1 or 2 whole years. Now she is a better scholar than I am. She has read lots. (self-made.) Some of the children went to college but I noticed they would call on Mama to tell them what a word meant, etc.

We had no GRADES at the time we went to school in the county except in Shelby and Kings Mountain. Belwood and Lawndale had some good schools at about that time, before old Boiling Springs Denominational High School began in 1907. My Father was the first one named on the Board of Trustees of the School. He was one of 4 or 5 of the Trustees that when they were put on they were put back on next year and every year till they passed on to the beyond. One was J. H. Quinn, E. B. Hamrick, W. W. Washburn, Kings Mountain Association. Johnny Edwards and I believe, Jake Alexander, from the Sandy Run association.



A LITTLE MORE WRITTEN APRIL 13TH. 1967

One of my Neighbors who lived to be 97 years old, told me this Story, which happened between 1826 & 1839. My Great, Great Grandfather passed from this Life in 1826, leaving my Great, Great, Grandmother with some of their 17 children, some Colored people, also some Horses, Cattle, etc. A Cart made to ride on, with wheels sawed off of a large Tree, with holes cut in the center of the wheel, so it would go on the pole which went under the cart, for the Axel. After her husband was gone, she drove two horses to this Cart, and went from her Home, near Beaver Dam creek, a distance of 3 or 4 miles, to Sandy Run Church for preaching services, and wore her husband's hat.



MY FIRST MEMORY OF WAGONS

We had what we called a log wagon, made of Hickory timber, The wheels had a hub, and spokes, running from the hub to a much larger rim. We had to use Pine Tar on the Spindles for a lubrication.



PINE TAR

We used Pine Tar, made from rich pine timber that was found in the Original Forest timber land.

My Father hired a colored man to help with the Farm work, and work at the Saw Mill. This colored man would work all day at the Saw Mill, and then after supper (you now call dinner) He would go through the woods, to rich pine timber, that had fallen. He got that rich timber, and cut it about 16 ins. long, and split it right fine, set it up, in a roundshape on the side of a gully, then he would cover it up thoroughly with green pine bows, then put some coals of fire right in the middle, on top where he had left an opening, of the green pine brows, then set the pine afire, then he would cover the coals with green pine brows, with about 6 ins. of dirt, then he would fix a trench on the side of the gully, to let the Tar run into a bucket or pot.



YESTERYEAR in CLEVELAND COUNTY, NC

PAGE 5 - REFLECTIONS OF JOE C. WASHBURN